Ethics Simulations

Why Simulations?

Universities and colleges are undergoing an era of unprecedented change. Students are dissatisfied with the old lecture style of teaching, they are the interactive generation, used to games which require high engagement levels. Students want an interactive, online and experiential education, one in which they can engage their curiosity and receive feedback as to their progress.


Experiential Simulations featured in Forbes Magazine and mentioned in's "In focus: Was 2014 the year of the entrepreneur?" web series and the Huffington Post.

Read the Forbes Article...

Our Simulations


Traction combines entrepreneurial theory and practical experience into a strategic pre and post revenue startup simulation game.


Coming Soon - Agile is a 4 person game which follows the technology development life cycle combining both agile and waterfall approaches.


Coming Soon - Ethos is a 4 person game exploring ethical concerns.

Project Management

Coming in 2015

Experiential Simulations simulation games have been featured in "Forbes Magazine", "EntrepeneurMiddleEast Magazine" and "How Gamification Reshapes Learning" book and mentioned in the Huffington Post and

Read the Forbes Article...

Read the EntrepeneurMiddleEast Article...

Read the Gamificiation book...

Read the EntrepeneurMiddleEast Article on entrepreneurship myths...

Read the Huffington Post mention...

Traction is bundled with the Canadian and US versions of the textbook, "Entrepreneurship", by Bygrave and Zacharakis of Babson College, and Wise of Ryerson University. Babson College is an acknowledged world leader in entrepreneurship. Ryerson University is the acknowledged top Canadian university in entrepreneurship. Traction is also bundled with "Patterns of Entrepreneurship" a practical guide to starting a company by Jack Kaplan of Columbia University.

Business Simulations

Some of our clients

engage. collaborate. learn.

Entrepreneurship Simulations


"Traction is great in class... after playing for a while you start seeing, how entrepreneurial decisions concerning different issues affect each other. So students see with their own eyes that there is no such thing as "minor issues" when you run a business. They don't believe you when you tell them this in class, but when they find out themselves . . . well, you should see their eyes, filled with sudden understanding! The most interesting things I've heard said is: "Oh my, I did not expect there is so much going on in business!" So if you wish to have a better understanding of "business insides" - welcome to Traction !"

Business Simulations

Anna Svirina
Head of Economics and Management Department
Kazan National Research Technical University

Ethics Simulations